One day soon we may be able to grow all the food we need, without contributing to climate change.

Most crops are intensively grown using artificial fertilisers, the production of which yields huge carbon emissions. The use of these chemicals damages soils and pollutes waterways. But there is another way. Experts at the UK’s Natural History Museum are part of a major collaboration to investigate the use of micro-organisms, known as bioinoculants, that can produce healthier, more nutritious soils. #netzero #missionzero #climatechange

The Natural History Museum is the second film in our Mission Zero series, which explores the organisations that are collaborating to deliver a cleaner greener future for us all. From environmentally friendly fertilisers, to beaming clean energy from space, green battery storage and hybrid aeroplanes, together we can achieve net zero.

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One day soon, we may be able to fly across an ocean, without contributing to climate change.

Photo by Jerry Zhang on Unsplash

Over the next 30 years, passenger numbers are expected to double, and without change, the aviation industry is projected to account for over 22% of all transport CO2 emissions by 2050.

But researchers from Qdot based at Harwell Science and Innovation Campus are helping to invent innovative hybrid aircraft that may herald a new era of clean flying.

QDot is designing ground-breaking new propulsion systems powered by electricity rather than fossil fuels. These propulsion systems won’t replace conventional aircraft engines, but they will make these aircraft significantly more efficient, dramatically reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the aviation industry.

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Harwell Science and Innovation Campus

Harwell Science and Innovation Campus

The UK’s leading science and innovation campus. Where government, academia and industry uniquely work together to solve the critical problems facing our planet